Exploring Cold War Berlin: 49 must see locations in Europe’s Cold War capital

There is hardly a city in the world with richer historical associations than the German capital, and in Exploring Cold War Berlin, Philip Baumann guides us through its post-World War Two streets fascinating and accessible detail.
There is hardly a city in the world with richer historical associations than the German capital, and in Exploring Cold War Berlin, Philip Baumann guides us through its post-World War Two streets fascinating and accessible detail.

There is hardly a city in the world with richer historical associations than the German capital, and in Exploring Cold War Berlin, Philip Baumann guides us through its post-World War Two streets fascinating and accessible detail.

Philip Baumann says…

We are strictly off the beaten track as we head to the location where, just eleven days after the border wall went up in 1961, East German citizen Günter Litfin was shot dead in a failed escape attempt.

Gunter Litfin

Then, we’ll see where the deadly bomb in April 1986 wrecked La Belle, a West Berlin discotheque popular with U.S. servicemen – leading to President Reagan ordering air strikes on Libya.

As we walk the streets of the capital, we’ll see the famed Stasi prisons, Palace of Tears crossing point, in tact remains of the Wall, the cemetery of the GDR elite, the famed refugee centre, the airports where the Berlin Airlift took place, the Rosa Luxembourg crime scene, we will stand where JKF declared ‘Ich Bin Eine Berliner’, visit the amazing Allied museum, and then head out to the Bridge of Spies and see the very room Europe’s fate was decided at the Potsdam Conference.

Palace of Tears
Palace of Tears

Then, we continue in this most fascinating of cities by seeing where the poet, playwright, and theatre director Bertolt Brecht lived and where Erich Honecker, Egon Krenz and over 20 other big-wigs from East Germany called home.

Erich Honecker

If you fancy, we could look at the little plane used by Matthias Rust, who at just 19, flew from Helsinki to Moscow, causing a sensation. The plane now has a home in Berlin- it’s an attraction not to be missed.

Take a look at ‘Staatsratsgebäude’ is a uniquely beautiful structure, just a few blocks from Alexanderplatz from where Walter Ulbricht maintained his iron-grip on East Germany.

We could also squeeze in a trip to the Forum Willy Brandt, on Unter den Linden – a modern and informative exhibition about the popular politician and the political developments of the last century.

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